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Author Bio: Danielle Canstello is party of the content marketing team at Pyramid Analytics. They provide enterprise level analytics and data analytics software. In her spare time, she writes around the web to spread her knowledge of the marketing, business intelligence and analytics industries.

Whatever type of business you run, if you have an online presence, you need to get customers to your site in order to make money.

One way to do that is to show up in the results when a potential customer does an online search. Being near the top in those search results is called Search Engine Optimization (SEO), and it helps drive traffic to your site.


A product description is the marketing copy that explains what a product is and why it’s worth purchasing. The purpose of a product description is to supply customers with important information about the features and benefits of the product so they’re compelled to buy.

However, entrepreneurs and marketers alike are susceptible to a very common mistake that comes up when writing product descriptions. Even professional copywriters make it sometimes: writing product descriptions that simply describe your products.

Why is it wrong? Because great product descriptions need to augment your product pages by selling your products to real people, not just acting as back-of-the-box dispensers of information for search engines (though search engine optimization can't be an afterthought, of course).


Few things are sadder than tuning into your analytics, excited to check out your sales numbers... and seeing data on thousands of abandoning customers. How did it come to this?

I mean, there you are, spending countless hours of work designing, optimizing, and A/B testing your online store. You’d think it would be enough to ensure good conversion rates and steadily grow your customer base.

But it isn’t.

As you may know, over 60% of buyers leave their shopping carts without completing a purchase. And they won’t come back to complete the checkout unless you incentivize them to do so.


If you’ve had a co.uk domain name for a few years you might have got email from your registrar recently about a “reserved” .uk domain.

What’s this all about?

When Nominet, the domain registry for co.uk (and .uk and others) introduced registrations directly under .uk they put a layer of protection in place for existing holders of .co.uk domains.


If you’ve ever posted anything on social media as a small brand, you know how often if feels like you’re talking to a void. Too often, no one responds. No likes, comments, retweets—you get the idea.

Not so with Instagram. No matter how small your audience, your posts probably still receive at least a few likes and comments—especially if you use relevant hashtags. And with 500 million daily active users, it’s an enticing marketing channel.

The business case for Instagram ecommerce is strong. Not only does Instagram's engagement demolish Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and LinkedIn, but, for brands, it even outperforms Facebook by a factor of ten.